Chronic Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms |  Causes & Prevention

Chronic Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms | Causes & Prevention

Chronic Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms |  Causes & Prevention

Chronic atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin condition that affects about 10 % of people worldwide. It develops due to an immune system reaction.

What is Chronic atopic dermatitis?

Chronic atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a condition that causes your skin to become red and itchy. It can occur at any age but it's common in children. Atopic dermatitis is long-lasting (chronic) and tends to flare periodically. It may be related to asthma or hay fever.

Till now, No cure for chronic atopic dermatitis. But self-care measures and treatments can prevent new outbreaks and relieve itching.

What are the Symptoms of Chronic atopic dermatitis?

Chronic atopic dermatitis symptoms and signs vary from one person to another and include:

1- Dry skin. 

2- Itching, which may be severe, especially at night.

3- Red to brownish-gray patches, especially on the hands, feet, ankles, wrists, neck, upper chest, eyelids, inside the bend of the elbows and knees, and in infants, the face and scalp.

4- Small, raised bumps, which often leak fluid and crust over when scratched.

5- Thickened, cracked, scaly skin.

6- Raw, sensitive, swollen skin from scratching.

Chronic atopic dermatitis most often starts before age 5 and may continue to adolescence and adulthood. For some people, it flushes periodically and then clears up for a time, even for several years.

When should you see a doctor?

You should see a doctor if

1-you are uncomfortable that the condition is affecting daily activities and sleep. 

2-Has a skin infection, examine red streaks, pus, yellow scabs.

3- symptoms are still present despite trying home remedies.

4- Your child has an infected rash and fever, seek immediate medical attention.

What are the Causes of Chronic atopic dermatitis?

Healthy skin helps store moisture and protects you from irritants, bacteria, and allergens. Chronic atopic dermatitis is related to a gene variation that affects the skin's ability to provide this protection. This makes your skin to be influenced by environmental factors, irritants, and allergens.

In some children, food allergies may have a role in causing chronic atopic dermatitis.

What are the Risk factors and triggers of chronic atopic dermatitis?

The primary risk factor for chronic atopic dermatitis is having a personal or family history of eczema, allergies, hay fever, or asthma.

Common triggers include:

1-irritants: such as soaps and detergents, including shampoo, washing-up liquid, and bubble bath.

2- environmental factors or allergens – such as cold and dry weather, dampness, and more specific things such as house dust mites, pet fur, pollen, and molds.

3- food allergies – such as allergies to cows' milk, eggs, peanuts, soy, or wheat.

4- certain materials are worn next to the skin – such as wool and synthetic fabrics.

5- hormonal changes – women may find their symptoms become worse in the days before their period or during pregnancy.

6- skin infections.

What are the Complications of Chronic atopic dermatitis?

Complications of  chronic atopic dermatitis (eczema) may include:

1- Asthma and hay fever: chronic atopic dermatitis sometimes outrun these conditions. More than half of young children with chronic atopic dermatitis by age 13 develop asthma and hay fever.

2- Chronic itchy, scaly skin:

 A skin condition called neurodermatitis (lichen simplex chronicus) begins with a patch of itchy skin. When You scratch the area, it becomes itchier. Eventually, you may claw simply out of habit. This condition can make the affected skin discolored, thick, and leathery.

3- Skin infections: 

Repeated abrasion that breaks the skin can cause open sores and cracks. These boost the risk of infection from bacteria and viruses, including the herpes simplex virus.

4- Irritant hand dermatitis:

 This especially affects people who have work that requires that their hands are usually wet and exposed to detergents, harsh soaps, and disinfectants.

5- Allergic contact dermatitis: 

This condition is common in people with chronic atopic dermatitis.

6- Sleep problems: 

The itch-scratch cycle can give rise to poor sleep quality.

How can you Prevent chronic atopic dermatitis?

The following  ways may help prevent dermatitis flares and minimize the drying effects of bathing:

1- Moisturize your skin at least twice a day:

 Creams, ointments, and lotions help to moisturize your skin. Try to choose a product that works well for you. Applying petroleum jelly on your baby's skin may help block the development of atopic dermatitis.

2- Try to identify and avoid triggers that worsen the condition:

Reduce your exposure to triggers

  That can worsen the skin reaction including sweat, stress, obesity, soaps, detergents, dust, and pollen. 

Children and Infants may experience flares from eating certain foods, including milk, eggs, soy, and wheat. Talk with your child's physician about identifying potential food allergies.

3- Take shorter baths or showers

Limit your showers and baths to 10 to 15 minutes and use warm, instead of hot water.

4- Take a bleach bath:

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends considering a bleach bath to help prevent flares. A diluted-bleach bath reduces bacteria on the skin and related infections. Add a half-cup (118 milliliters) of household bleach, not concentrated bleach, to a 40-gallon (151-liter) bathtub filled with warm water. Measures are for a U.S.-standard-sized tub filled with overflow drainage holes.

Steep from the neck down or just the infected areas of the skin for about 10 minutes. Do not immerse the head. 

5- Use only gentle soaps:

Choose mild soaps because Deodorant soaps and antibacterial soaps can take out more natural oils and dry your skin.

6- Dry yourself carefully: 

After bathing gently, slap your skin dry with a soft towel and apply emollients while your skin is still damp.

Summary

Chronic atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin condition, related to a gene variation that affects the skin's ability to provide this protection.

If Your child has an infected rash and fever, seek immediate medical attention.

Most people use eczema word when referring to atopic dermatitis, as it is the most common type. 

 

Children and Infants may experience flares from eating certain foods, including milk, eggs, soy, and wheat